[abstract] A novel, ultra-high pulse rate CO2 laser for wound debridement: Preliminary report in a swine skin model

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[abstract] A novel, ultra-high pulse rate CO2 laser for wound debridement: Preliminary report in a swine skin model

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Title: [abstract] A novel, ultra-high pulse rate CO2 laser for wound debridement: Preliminary report in a swine skin model
Author: Lo, T; Tan, L; Lum, M; Terry, M
Abstract: Introduction: Pulsed CO2 lasers have been tested for use in burn debridement and found to be unacceptable due to the excessive amount of underlying tissue damage [1]. We tested a prototype laser system designed to address this limitation. The objective of this study is to assess the capability of the system to achieve maximal spot size, defined as the power getting to any one point on the target material, with least amount of adjacent tissue damage. Methods: A prototype pulsed CO2 laser system was used in testing our hypothesis. Settings: wavelength 10.6 nanometers, pulse width 200 nanoseconds, repetition rate 2 hertz and a fluence 5 joules/cm2. We tested three spot sizes: 1mm2, 5mm2 and 10mm2, using swine skin as target tissue. On 20 samples per spot size, punch biopsies were obtained. Photomicrographs were made of each slide, with an embedded distance scale for quantification of tissue damage length and depth. Three measures per slide were made and then averaged. Results: The 10mm2 spot size yielded an average penetrating damage of 0.45mm with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.08mm. The 5mm2 spot size yielded an average penetrating damage of 0.39mm (SD of 0.08mm) and the 1mm2 spot size yielded an average penetrating damage of 0.17mm (SD of 0.07mm). Statistical significant difference in penetrating tissue damage was found between the 1mm2 and 5mm2 (P=0.0000021) and between the 5mm2 and 10mm2 spot size (P=0.0357). Introduction: Pulsed CO2 lasers have been tested for use in burn debridement and found to be unacceptable due to the excessive amount of underlying tissue damage [1]. We tested a prototype laser system designed to address this limitation. The objective of this study is to assess the capability of the system to achieve maximal spot size, defined as the power getting to any one point on the target material, with least amount of adjacent tissue damage. Methods: A prototype pulsed CO2 laser system was used in testing our hypothesis. Settings: wavelength 10.6 nanometers, pulse width 200 nanoseconds, repetition rate 2 hertz and a fluence 5 joules/cm2. We tested three spot sizes: 1mm2, 5mm2 and 10mm2, using swine skin as target tissue. On 20 samples per spot size, punch biopsies were obtained. Photomicrographs were made of each slide, with an embedded distance scale for quantification of tissue damage length and depth. Three measures per slide were made and then averaged. Results: The 10mm2 spot size yielded an average penetrating damage of 0.45mm with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.08mm. The 5mm2 spot size yielded an average penetrating damage of 0.39mm (SD of 0.08mm) and the 1mm2 spot size yielded an average penetrating damage of 0.17mm (SD of 0.07mm). Statistical significant difference in penetrating tissue damage was found between the 1mm2 and 5mm2 (P=0.0000021) and between the 5mm2 and 10mm2 spot size (P=0.0357).
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine : Journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc.
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/9955
Date: 2011

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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