[abstract] Neutrophil activation status in Navy clearance divers following decompression in trimix dives with in-water oxygen decompression

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[abstract] Neutrophil activation status in Navy clearance divers following decompression in trimix dives with in-water oxygen decompression

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Title: [abstract] Neutrophil activation status in Navy clearance divers following decompression in trimix dives with in-water oxygen decompression
Author: Cameron, BA; Rhind, SG; Holden, N; Eaton, DJ; Nishi, RY; Bouak, F; Bateman, WA; McLellan, TM
Abstract: Background: Immunoinflammatory response (IR) may play an important role in the evolution of decompression stress to decompression sickness (DCS). It is thought that an important IR pathway exists during decompression stress when venous endothelial cells (ECs), mechanically disturbed by venous gas emboli (VGE), express a broad spectrum of intercellular messengers that systemically activate platelets, peripheral blood cells and other ECs. DCS onset may involve a cascade of messengers produced by activated cells within the vasculature similar to systemic inflammatory response syndrome in sepsis. Neutrophil activation is a hallmark of innate immune function and may serve as an important diagnostic marker of DCS. Methods: Using multicolor flow cytometry and antibodies against nine specific neutrophil surface proteins, we examined the activation status of neutrophils in navy clearance divers (n=8) following decompression (DCIEM decompression algorithm) in a range of trimix dives that all included in-water O2 decompression (IWO2). Results: Many activation markers were affected by the dives. For example, the surface density of two neutrophil- EC adhesion molecules, CD62L (neutrophil capture) and CD11b (neutrophil 2-Integrin), were significantly reduced following the dive to 69 msw for 20 minutes. Moreover, the neutrophil surface protein marker, CD162, known to interact with CD62L during IR, showed a similar trend after the 69-msw dive. Indeed, the surface density of six of the nine CDs examined in the neutrophils of clearance divers was significantly reduced after this dive. Summary: Although the 69 msw dive generated very high levels of VGE, the low surface densities of CD62L, CD11b, CD162 and three other CDs suggest that a component of the dive suppressed neutrophil activation. A possible mechanism for suppressed neutrophil activation during IWO2 could be similar to that reported during medical HBO2T where IR is involved. Neutrophil activation status may be useful for diagnosis of DCS and prediction of ideal decompression schedules.
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine : Journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc.
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/9943
Date: 2011

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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