[abstract] YOGA-BREATHING, APNEA, AND ALVEOLAR GAS EXCHANGE.

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[abstract] YOGA-BREATHING, APNEA, AND ALVEOLAR GAS EXCHANGE.

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Title: [abstract] YOGA-BREATHING, APNEA, AND ALVEOLAR GAS EXCHANGE.
Author: Andersson, J; Larsson, J; Schagatay, E
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Competitive breath-hold divers use different techniques to prepare both mentally and physically before diving. Long periods of slow, deep breathing have been reported to precede diving in elite breath-hold divers. We investigated how a specific, yoga inspired, pre-dive ventilation used by some Swedish elite breath-hold divers affect alveolar gas exchange and apneic ability. METHODS: Four divers experienced in using yoga-techniques before breath-holding volunteered. They performed four breath-holds with face immersion in 10 degree C water during prone rest, spaced by >20 min of rest. The two last breath-holds were preceded by two 3-min periods of "yoga-breathing", Le., slow and deep breathing, separated by 5 min of rest. Apnea followed the end of the second yoga-breathing period. The apneic times in all four breath-holds were predetermined and kept equal. Respiratory and cardiovascular parameters were recorded non-invasively. The two phases of the apnea were identified by recording the thoracic movements and detecting the onset of involuntary breathing movements triggered by the increase in PaCO2. RESULTS: The ventilation increased from 11.4 l*min^-1 before the control apneas to 23.3 l*min^-l during the yoga-breathing (P<001). The pre-apneic PET CO2-values were lowered from 4.74 to 3.78 mmHg after yoga-breathing (P<0.05), and the RER were 1.03 and 1.44, respectively (P<0.05). The mean breath-holding time of the apneas was 161 s, and the duration of the first, "easy going phase" was 102 s in the control apneas. After yoga-breathing the duration of the "easy going phase" had dramatically increased (P<0.01), as no involuntary breathing movements appeared during the subsequent apneas. CONCLUSIONS: The yoga-breathing performed by these divers was clearly a hyperventilation with profound physiological effects, and may be a risk factor in competitive apneic diving. This prolonged hyperventilation probably affects not only the CO2 stores of fast-equilibrating tissues, i.e., lungs and blood, but also that of slow tissues, i.e., muscles.
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org)
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/6931
Date: 2000

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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