[abstract] DOES RECREATIONAL OR SPORT DIVING AFFECT BRAIN FUNCTION? INITIAL RESULTS OF THE GENEVA "MEMORY DIVE" STUDY.

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[abstract] DOES RECREATIONAL OR SPORT DIVING AFFECT BRAIN FUNCTION? INITIAL RESULTS OF THE GENEVA "MEMORY DIVE" STUDY.

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Title: [abstract] DOES RECREATIONAL OR SPORT DIVING AFFECT BRAIN FUNCTION? INITIAL RESULTS OF THE GENEVA "MEMORY DIVE" STUDY.
Author: Valera-Kummer, S; Chicherio, Ch; Ludwig, C; Genton, L; Mayer, E; de Ribaupierre, A; Pichard, C; Annoni, J-M; Slosman, DO
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Our study aimed to question if diving activity or behavior influences functional parameters of brain activity and neuropsychological performance. Long term neurological consequences of diving was controversial for many years, mostly because they were based on cross-sectional studies, and on the localization of anatomical brain lesions in MRI. METHODS: We included healthy subjects performing recreational or sport diving activity. Initial evaluation included neuropsychological testing and quantitative measurement of global cerebral blood flow (CBF) by SPECT with 133Xe. Diving activity has been recorded in terms of total number of dives, and number of dives below 40 meters. The cohort was subdivided as a function of diving activity into low (LD: 0-40 dives/yr.), standard (SD: 41-60), high (HD: 61-100), and very high activity (VD: >100). Divers were categorized as a function of their behavior as mostly lake diving (LA: >80% dives in the Geneva lake) and minimal lake activity and mostly warm sea dives (WA: <20%). All statistical analyses were performed taking age into account. RESULTS: Initial evaluation included 128 subjects (92M: 36F; mean age: 36.5±9.4 yr.; range: 18-71 yr.). Fifteen subjects with suspected decompression illness (DCI) were identified, and it corresponds to a prevalence of 0.036% suspected DCI, that concerns divers with either VD or HD activity and with a LA behavior. Those subjects were excluded of our analyses. CBF measurement: Results indicated that global CBF was affected by diving behavior (in disfavor of LA) but not by diving activity. Neuropsychological performance: Diving activity affects memory, with VD subjects showing reduced controlled processes. Diving behavior modifies performance, with reduced controlled processes for LA. No changes in memory performance were observed in automatic processing. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggests that very active diving behavior may be associated with slight but significant changes in brain perfusion as well as memory performance. The longitudinal phase will enable to confirm these results.
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org)
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/6780
Date: 2000

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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