[abstract] A NOVEL HUMAN FACTORS TRAINING CURRICULUM IN US NAVY DIVING

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[abstract] A NOVEL HUMAN FACTORS TRAINING CURRICULUM IN US NAVY DIVING

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dc.contributor.author O'Connor, PE en_US
dc.contributor.author Muller, MS en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-09-22T21:23:01Z
dc.date.available 2006-09-22T21:23:01Z
dc.date.issued 2006 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/3766
dc.description Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org ) en_US
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: The cause of approximately 80 percent of mishaps in high-reliability industries (e.g. aviation, nuclear power generation) is generally regarded as human error. Thus, specific training designed to mitigate human error is increasingly being given to operators in high-reliability industries. However, US Navy divers and undersea medical officers have historically received minimal human factors training MATERIALS AND METHODS: An analysis of data collected from 263 U.S. Navy diving mishap reports, five U.S. Navy diving fatality reports, 15 interviews with U.S. Navy divers who had been involved in an accident or near-miss and 272 attitude questionnaires designed to measure U.S. Navy diver attitudes to factors that influence the safety of diving operations was conducted. This information was utilized to develop a guide to the non-technical skills required for safe and productive diving. A training curriculum based upon this research was developed and integrated into diver training at one US Navy Special Operations command. Finally, the Human Factors Accident Classification System (HFACS) was applied to a set of diving casualties to evaluate its utility for classifying the causes of diving accidents and near-misses RESULTS: Analysis of U.S. Navy diving mishap reporting indicated a disproportionately low percentage were attributed to human factors, with 70 percent of mishaps attributed to unknown causes. Further, in the majority of the 60 accidents classified as ‘human error', little detail was provided as to the underlying causes. Positive feedback was received on the incorporation of human factors training in the Navy Special Operations community. Further, the HFACS would appear to be a valuable tool for investigating U.S. Navy diving accidents. However, there is a necessity to train diving accident investigators to use HFACS, and tailor it for use in military diving CONCLUSIONS: The role of human error in diving mishaps is underappreciated. Increased emphasis on training to reduce human error will mitigate diving mishaps, improve team performance and identify the root causes of accidents and near-misses. The incorporation of a formal training curriculum for operators and mishap investigators (diving medical officers, diving supervisors, etc) is an important element for continued safe and productive diving operations. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.rights Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org ) en_US
dc.subject human en_US
dc.subject HUMAN FACTORS en_US
dc.subject fatality en_US
dc.subject error en_US
dc.subject root cause en_US
dc.subject questionnaire en_US
dc.subject safety en_US
dc.title [abstract] A NOVEL HUMAN FACTORS TRAINING CURRICULUM IN US NAVY DIVING en_US

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