Electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging after diving and decompression incidents: a controlled study

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Electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging after diving and decompression incidents: a controlled study

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dc.contributor.author Sipinen, SA en_US
dc.contributor.author Ahovuo, J en_US
dc.contributor.author Halonen, JP en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-08-23T01:11:35Z
dc.date.available 2006-08-23T01:11:35Z
dc.date.issued 1999 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Undersea Hyperb Med. 1999 Summer;26(2):61-5. en_US
dc.identifier.other Undersea Hyperb Med en_US
dc.identifier.uri PMID: 10372424 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/2332
dc.description Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org ) en_US
dc.description.abstract Electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging after diving and decompression incidents: a controlled study. Undersea Hyper Med 1999.; 26(2):61-65.--Diving incidents with symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS) and/or arterial gas emboli (AGE) might increase the degree of pathologic change in the electroencephalogram (EEG) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the supraspinal central nervous system (CNS). Diving itself, even without known symptoms of DCS and/or AGE, has been proposed to increase the number of CNS lesions using either EEG or MRI. In the first part of a two-part study we examined the effects of recompression treatment on EEG in decompression incidents in a group of sport and professional divers compared with a control group of healthy naval divers. In the second part we recorded brain MRI from three groups of volunteers: 1) divers who were treated for DCS in pressure chamber, 2) divers who had never had symptoms of DCS (and/or AGE), and 3) healthy normal controls who were not divers. Our results indicate that DCS increases the incidence of pathologic EEG recordings, whereas recompression treatment decreases them. The results of MRI do not verify evidence of increased numbers of CNS lesions in normal divers as compared to non-diving, healthy control subjects, whereas some of the divers treated for DCS in a pressure chamber had hyperintense lesions in brain white matter. None of them had any abnormalities in EEG, neurologic performance, or psychologic behavior. Both EEG and MRI are sensitive and non-specific methods for judging suspected evidence of brain lesions from diving or diving accidents. en_US
dc.format.extent 1301239 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.rights Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org ) en_US
dc.source.uri null en_US
dc.subject decompression en_US
dc.subject magnetic resonance imaging en_US
dc.subject Electroencephalography en_US
dc.subject incidents en_US
dc.subject high pressure neurologic syndrome en_US
dc.subject.mesh Adult Case-Control Studies Decompression Sickness/physiopathology* Decompression Sickness/therapy Diving/physiology* Electroencephalography Embolism, Air/physiopathology* High Pressure Neurological Syndrome/physiopathology Humans Magnetic Resonance Imaging Male Middle Aged en_US
dc.title Electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging after diving and decompression incidents: a controlled study en_US

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