[abstract] THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DIVING TECHNIQUES AND REPORTED 'FORGETFULNESS OR LOSS OF CONCENTRATION': THE ELTHI DIVING STUDY.

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[abstract] THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DIVING TECHNIQUES AND REPORTED 'FORGETFULNESS OR LOSS OF CONCENTRATION': THE ELTHI DIVING STUDY.

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Title: [abstract] THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DIVING TECHNIQUES AND REPORTED 'FORGETFULNESS OR LOSS OF CONCENTRATION': THE ELTHI DIVING STUDY.
Author: Macdiarmid, JI; Ross, JAS; Watt, SJ; Osman, LM; Godden, DJ; Lawson, A; Taylor, CL; Crawford, JR; Adie, WR
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: There is growing concern about the impact diving may have on the brain and subsequent neurological function. Some studies have shown that divers report neurological problems, such as poor memory or lack of concentration. This study investigated the relationship of reported symptoms to experience of different types of diving techniques. METHODS: 1540 commercial divers who had registered a professional qualification with HSE before 1991, and an age match group of non-diving offshore workers (n = 1035) completed a postal questionnaire describing their general health complaints and hyperbaric occupational history. Logistic regression models, adjusted for a history of decompression illness, lifestyle factors (age, social deprivation, binge drinking, smoking and head injury) and welding, were used to compare 'forgetfulness or loss of concentration' with different diving techniques. RESULTS: Divers were 3 times more likely to report 'forgetfulness or loss of concentration' than offshore workers. Reported symptoms of 'forgetfulness or loss of concentration' was associated with specific diving techniques, including air/nitrox surface decompression diving (p=0.01), mixed gas bounce diving (p=0.01) and saturation diving (p=0.02), but not air/nitrox SCUBA (p=0.2) or air/nitrox surface supplied diving (p=0.4). The likelihood of reported 'forgetfulness or loss of concentration' increased as the number of dives performed increased, in all the diving groups with a significant association. Reported neurological DCI, but not pain only DCI was related to 'forgetfulness or loss of concentration'. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study support previous work that professional diving is associated with 'forgetfulness or loss of concentration'. Furthermore, there was a dose response between these symptoms and experience of air/nitrox SurDO2, mixed gas bounce and saturation diving, and the occurrence of reported neurological DCI. forgetfulness, memory, diving, diving techniques
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/1288
Date: 2003

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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