[abstract] MANAGEMENT OF OXYGEN SEIZURES IN A PATIENT TREATED FOR RADIATION BRAIN INJURY. A CASE STUDY.

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[abstract] MANAGEMENT OF OXYGEN SEIZURES IN A PATIENT TREATED FOR RADIATION BRAIN INJURY. A CASE STUDY.

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Title: [abstract] MANAGEMENT OF OXYGEN SEIZURES IN A PATIENT TREATED FOR RADIATION BRAIN INJURY. A CASE STUDY.
Author: Subbotina, N; Jacobino, R; Pace, E; Campos, H; Knezevich, F
Abstract: The injured brain tissue is vulnerable to oxygen. When treating patients with neurological disorders a special protocol is sometimes called for. A 37-year-old male patient developed radiation necrosis after undergoing radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformation. He was referred to our hyperbaric unit after 8 months of symptoms: dizziness, seizures, and right hemiparesis, predominantly crural. The patient received: Deltisone B 20 mg and Lamotrigine 50 mg. At the first contact with 100% oxygen at normal pressure he developed focal tonic/clonic seizures in the affected upper and lower extremities. The seizure lasted one minute. A second attempt to breathe oxygen provoked a new onset of seizures, so the patient was referred to his neurologist to update his anticonvulsant treatment. Carbamazepine was added in a progressive dosage reaching 1200 mg and Lorazepam 2 mg immediately before HBOT. Fifteen minutes after beginning the HBOT at 1.2 ATA the patient developed a similar pattern of seizures. HBOT being crucial for this patient, a special protocol was designed: É Three 5-minute intervals of breathing air alternating with periods of oxygen until a total of 60 minutes of HBOT had been provided. É A progressive increase in pressure from session to session. At the 10th session the patient tolerated 2.0 ATA. An improvement in his right limb motility (gait) was obvious. Due to administrative problems after the 10th session, the HBOT was interrupted and the patient did not return to the chamber until 2 months later. Again he developed seizures at 1.2 ATA and the same protocol was repeated. The patient’s adaptation to oxygen during the second HBOT course was faster than during the first course. CONCLUSION: In this case the adaptation to hyperbaric oxygen occurred with the intermittent oxygen/air protocol and the progressive increase of pressure from one session to another. This adaptation was temporary and disappeared within two months. The second set of HBOT sessions produced a faster adaptation to hyperbaric oxygen than the first set experienced by this patient.
Description: Abstract of the Undersea & Hyperbaric Medical Society 2008 Annual Scientific Meeting June 26-28, 2008 Salt Lake City Marriott Downtown, Salt Lake City, Utah.
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/7848
Date: 2008

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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