[abstract] DECOMPRESSION COMPARISON OF N2 AND O2 IN RATS.

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[abstract] DECOMPRESSION COMPARISON OF N2 AND O2 IN RATS.

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dc.contributor.author Lillo, RS
dc.date.accessioned 2008-06-25T18:35:04Z
dc.date.available 2008-06-25T18:35:04Z
dc.date.issued 1990
dc.identifier.citation Undersea Biomedical Research, Vol. 16, No. 1 Supplement, March 1990 en
dc.identifier.uri http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/7100
dc.description Abstract of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. Joint Annual Scientific Meeting with the International Congress for Hyperbaric Medicine and the European Undersea Biomedical Society held 11-18 August 1990. Okura Hotel, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (http://www.uhms.org) en
dc.description.abstract In a previous report (1), O2 in the diving mixture was found to substantially add to the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in rats following rapid (<10 s) decompression profiles. The rate of O2 uptake was extremely fast (<1 min estimated for equilibrium) compared to much slower rates for He and N2 In order to further define the role that O2 plays in diving, the present investigation examined decompression outcome in rats following dives in which PO2 and PN2 were varied. Slower decompression profiles were used to determine the rate at which the O2 effect decreased as pressure was reduced. Experiments involved subjecting unanesthetized male albino rats, Rattus norvegicus, to a series of 60-min N2-O2 dives (variable percentage of 02 depth: 174 or 207 fsw). Decompresston profiles were varied and included decompression "stops" of up to 20 min. The probability of DCS was modeled using the maximum likelihood technique. O2 was again found to exert a large effect on decompression outcome. The rate at which the effect of O2 declined during decompression was very rapid; N2 washout was consideribly longer. These findings further support the view that O2 can add significantly to decompression risk: its effect develops very quickly during compression, but diminishes very quickly during decompression. Thus, this phenomenon may not normally be encountered during human diving operations where relatively slow decompression is used. 1) Lillo, R.S. J. Appl. Physiol. 64:7.042-2052, 1988. (Supported by NMRDC Work Unit 63713N M0099.01A-1002) (UHMS SPON: J.R. Clarke) en
dc.format.extent 193 bytes
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. en
dc.subject DIVING en
dc.subject decompression sickness en
dc.subject nitrogen en
dc.subject oxygen en
dc.subject animal en
dc.subject rat en
dc.subject DECOMPRESSION en
dc.title [abstract] DECOMPRESSION COMPARISON OF N2 AND O2 IN RATS. en
dc.type Article en

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    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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