[abstract] CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION AND RADIATION TISSUE INJURY

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[abstract] CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION AND RADIATION TISSUE INJURY

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Title: [abstract] CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION AND RADIATION TISSUE INJURY
Author: Hill, L; Jubeliere, RJ; Kain, T; McMullin, MJ
Abstract: BACKGROUND: To provide a clinical HBO case study related to the complications of radiation tissue injury post-cardiac catheterization. INTRODUCTION: Interventional procedures in radiology and cardiology often involve high radiation doses to patients' skin. Although more than 700,000 interventional procedures are performed annually, the incidence of radiation injuries is small. However, these injuries can be debilitating, chronic and often require a prolonged course of treatment. Despite the advances in interventional equipment, patients may experience an unanticipated radiation dose to the skin unidentified by the clinician. Over time, they may develop skin ulceration or necrosis. In this case study, we evaluate and treat a patient with a non-healing wound for six months who had a history of cardiac catheterization. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review was used to provide the patient s events. BRIEF HISTORY: The patient is a 58-year-old white female admitted to Comprehensive Wound Healing Center at Abington Memorial Hospital for a non-healing wound on her right scapular area, consistent with the fluoroscopic arm in the AO projection. Her PMH is significant for CAD, stents x3 and obesity. Prior wound biopsy showed no tumor or inflammatory changes. On initial exam, the wound measured 4.5 x 1.5 cm with a 4.0 cm rim of ertythema of the periwound and extensive fibrin on the base. A TCOM performed that day revealed a fourfold increase in the tissue oxygenation levels with oxygen stimulation. After 50 HBOT and topical wound care, she had a wound excision and flap and 10 subsequent HBOT for complete healing at 28 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: This case study demonstrates the need for a thorough wound assessment and history in patients with chronic non-healing wounds. With proper wound diagnosis and treatment, irradiated tissue ulcerations can heal and do not need to be debilitating or lifelong.
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/1732
Date: 2005

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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