[abstract] APPEARANCE OF SUSPICIOUS SKIN LESIONS IN A PATIENT UNDERGOING HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY FOR TREATMENT OF SOFT TISSUE RADIONECROSIS SECONDARY TO CUTANEOUS T-CELL LYMPHOMA

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[abstract] APPEARANCE OF SUSPICIOUS SKIN LESIONS IN A PATIENT UNDERGOING HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY FOR TREATMENT OF SOFT TISSUE RADIONECROSIS SECONDARY TO CUTANEOUS T-CELL LYMPHOMA

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Title: [abstract] APPEARANCE OF SUSPICIOUS SKIN LESIONS IN A PATIENT UNDERGOING HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY FOR TREATMENT OF SOFT TISSUE RADIONECROSIS SECONDARY TO CUTANEOUS T-CELL LYMPHOMA
Author: Gentry, S; Van Meter, KW; Harch, PG; LeGros, TL
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is used to treat soft tissue radionecrosis (STRN) and is generally considered safe. Herein we report a case of a patient who developed multiple suspicious skin lesions while receiving HBOT for treatment of STRN after radiotherapy for Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. CASE REPORT: A 58 year old woman presented for care of three chronic wounds secondary to soft tissue radionecrosis following whole body irradiation and lesion specific radiotherapy for biopsy diagnosed Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (Mycosis Fungoides). She was in remission at presentation. Physical exam revealed several chronic wounds at sites of previous lesions and radiotherapy. Biopsy at presentation demonstrated only acute and chronic inflammatory changes. An arterial ultrasound and plain x-rays were without any acute abnormalities and MRI failed to demonstrate osteomyelitis. Transcutaneous oxygen measurements registered greater than 61 mm Hg in all leads. She was treated for three weeks with topical wound care without improvement of a foot wound and therefore daily HBOT was added. She received 2.0 ATA of 100percent oxygen for ninety minutes (one treatment daily for eight days). HBOT was discontinued due to the appearance of nineteen new skin lesions that were similar in appearance to her previous Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and occurred at the same skin sites as previous lesions. Biopsies obtained revealed acute and chronic inflammatory changes. Two weeks later she began chemotherapy. After three months of chemotherapy and local wound care all except two wounds had healed. DISCUSSION: These lesions were suspicious for Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma because of appearance and location. Tissue biopsy was not diagnostic, however one taken several weeks before their appearance was similarly not diagnostic. A pathologically certain diagnosis of T-cell lymphoma is difficult to obtain often requiring many specimens. Recurrence of Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma following HBOT has not been reported. In fact, HBOT is regarded as safe therapy for previously diagnosed cancer patients.
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/1552
Date: 2004

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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