[abstract] WHITE MATTER HYPERINTENSITIES, BASAL GANGLIA LESIONS AND NEUROCOGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT FOLLOWING CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING

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[abstract] WHITE MATTER HYPERINTENSITIES, BASAL GANGLIA LESIONS AND NEUROCOGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT FOLLOWING CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING

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Title: [abstract] WHITE MATTER HYPERINTENSITIES, BASAL GANGLIA LESIONS AND NEUROCOGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT FOLLOWING CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING
Author: Hopkins, RO; Weaver, LK; Parkinson, RB; Foley, J; Cleavenger, H; Victoroff, J; Bigler, ED
Abstract: BACKGROUND: To minimize selection bias, and to further quantify neuroimaging sequelae following CO poisoning, we conducted a sequential, prospective study to assess white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), basal ganglia lesions, and neurocognitive impairments due to CO-poisoning. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-three consecutive CO-poisoned patients treated with 100percent O2 had MR scans and neurocognitive tests: within 36 hours after CO poisoning, and at 2-weeks and 6-months following CO poisoning. The initial mean COHb=22.0+/-10.6percent, and 52percent had loss of consciousness (LOC). All scans were evaluated blind to scan sequence and group. Scan data was compared to age- and gender-matched control subjects' within a normative imaging database.1 A neurologist assessed basal ganglia lesions in axial slices through the internal capsule. WMHs in the periventricular and centrum semiovale regions were scored using a 4-point rating scale by two trained, independent raters. We also looked for correlations between the presence of WMHs and neurocognitive impairments. RESULTS: Twelve percent of the CO-poisoned patients had periventricular WMHs on the initial MR scan compared to 5percent of the controls (p=0.04). The WMHs did not change from initial to 6 months. One CO-poisoned patient had new bilateral basal ganglia lesions at 2 weeks, which resolved by 6 months. Thirty percent of these CO-poisoned patients had neurocognitive impairments persisting to 6 months, and there was no correlation with the presence of the periventricular WMHs. Initial carboxyhemoglobin levels, LOC, or LOC duration did not correlate with the presence of WMHs. LOC correlated with neurocognitive impairments. CONCLUSION: CO poisoning can result in brain injury manifested predominantly by neurocognitive impairments and WMHs. Basal ganglia lesions in our patients were rare and transient. 1. Blatter DD. AJNR 1995;16:241-51. Supported by the Grants from: Deseret Foundation, LDS Hospital ( 247, 275, 305); Fulton Family Foundation, and the College of Home, Family, and Social Sciences, Brigham Young University.Carbon monoxide, Poisoning.
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/1190
Date: 2002

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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