[abstract] OCULAR TEAR FILM BUBBLE COUNTS AFTER RECREATIONAL COMPRESSED AIR DIVING.

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[abstract] OCULAR TEAR FILM BUBBLE COUNTS AFTER RECREATIONAL COMPRESSED AIR DIVING.

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Title: [abstract] OCULAR TEAR FILM BUBBLE COUNTS AFTER RECREATIONAL COMPRESSED AIR DIVING.
Author: Bennett, MH; Doolette, DJ; Heffernan, N
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: There remains no reliable and practical diagnostic tool for decompression sickness (DCS). While previous authors have demonstrated an increase in tear film bubble counts following dry, compressed air dives, no attempt has been made to demonstrate bubbles following wet diving. We hypothesised that increased bubble counts would be present after wet diving and that raised counts may prove to be useful in estimating the decompression stress following standard depth, time and decompression exposures. Further, tear film examination in symptomatic individuals might prove to be an important diagnostic aid for clinical DCS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the lower tear film meniscus for the presence of bubbles in 42 volunteer divers after compressed air dives on a single day and in 11 volunteer divers undergoing repetitive, multi-day diving exposures over 5 days. Repeated bubble count estimations were made using a standard slit-lamp (SL900, Haag-Streit, Switzerland) up to 72 hours after diving. All dives were made within accepted recreational dive tables (PADI) and no more than two dives were made on the same day. RESULTS: Following diving, bubble counts increased significantly (P less than 0.01) from pre-dive values. From a pre-dive median (inter-quartile range) of 0 (0-0.33) bubbles/eye, single day divers reached a maximum bubble count at 48 hours after diving of 1 (0-2.25) bubbles/eye. Similarly, from a pre-dive count of 0.33 (0-1) bubbles/eye, multi-day divers had increased bubble counts from 24 hours following their first dive until 24 hours following their final dive when counts were 1.67 (0.92-3.08) bubbles/eye. Bubble counts during multi-dive, multi-day diving. (P less than 0.01 compared to pre-dive) CONCLUSIONS: Tear film bubble counts are raised following wet compressed air diving for 24 to 48 hours as previously described following dry diving. These modest rises may be of use in comparing decompression stress for experimental dive profiles. Future studies may attempt to develop tear film bubble counting as a method of differentiating those with DCS from those in which DCS is unlikely.
Description: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc. (http://www.uhms.org )
URI: http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/1050
Date: 2001

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  • UHMS Meeting Abstracts
    This is a collection of the published abstracts from the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society (UHMS) annual meetings.

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