Dive Computer Use in Recreational Diving: Insights from the DAN-DSL Database

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Dive Computer Use in Recreational Diving: Insights from the DAN-DSL Database

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dc.contributor.author Balestra, C en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2013-01-04T05:30:05Z
dc.date.available 2013-01-04T05:30:05Z
dc.date.issued 2012 en_US
dc.identifier.citation In: Blogg, S.L., M.A. Lang, and A. Møllerløkken, editors. 2012. Proceedings of the Validation of Dive Computers Workshop. August 24, 2011, European Underwater and Baromedical Society Symposium, Gdansk. Trondheim: Norwegian University of Science and Technology. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/10152
dc.description The publication of the Proceedings of the Validation of Dive Computer Workshop is cosponsored by NTNU and the Norwegian Labour Inspection Authority. The symposium was convened by the Baromedical and Environmental Physiology Group of NTNU on August 24, 2011, at the 37th Annual Meeting of the European Underwater and Baromedical Society in Gdansk, Poland. en_US
dc.description.abstract Data from the DAN Europe Diving Safety Laboratory (DSL) suggest that approximately 95% of recreational diving is carried out today using a dive computer. The most widely dived computers/algorithms, irrespective of brand, use the Bühlmann ZHL-16 or the Wienke RGBM algorithm, with roughly a 50/50 distribution across the DSL population. The vast majority of the 167 recorded decompression sickness (DCS) cases occurred without any significant violation of the respective algorithm’s limits, i.e., most occurred while using gradient factors that were well below the maximum allowed by the algorithm. The DSL database and field research also show that many other physiological variables may be involved in the pathogenesis of DCS, even within computed “safe” limits, causing a variable individual response despite similar inert gas supersaturation levels. We conclude that the current computer validation modalities, although important and useful as a basic benchmark, still allow a probability of DCS beyond ideal levels in a recreational setting. In order to limit unexpected DCS a more aggressive “biological” approach is recommended that is able to identify and then control the most significant physiological variables involved in the pathogenesis of DCS, in addition to the inert gas supersaturation levels. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Norwegian University of Science and Technology. en_US
dc.subject diving computer en_US
dc.subject equipment en_US
dc.subject Bühlmann en_US
dc.subject RGBM en_US
dc.subject decompression sickness en_US
dc.subject DCS en_US
dc.subject decompression model en_US
dc.subject validation en_US
dc.subject safety en_US
dc.subject supersaturation en_US
dc.subject decompression algorithm en_US
dc.subject human en_US
dc.subject DAN en_US
dc.title Dive Computer Use in Recreational Diving: Insights from the DAN-DSL Database en_US
dc.type Article en_US

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